Why We Still Need to Read Labels, An Update!

So After contacting Promax last night, and leaving a message on Twitter about this issue, they wrote me back with this:

” While barley/barley malt  contain  gluten, barley malt extract does not.  Gluten is found in the protein portion of a wheat product.  Barley malt extract contains no protein.  Further more, we have tested this bar several times for gluten and it falls well below not only the FDA proposed limit of 20ppm but also the GFCO’s (Gluten Free Certifying Organization) standard of 10 ppm.  Part of the agreement with the GFCO is that  the bars and the manufacturing facility be audited for the presence of gluten regularly.  We have always tested well below the standards above. “

Ok…But then I read articles like this one, which state:

” Why the confusion over barley malt extract?
It is very tricky to test for barley contamination in food. One of the assays (sandwich omega-gliadin ELISA) severely underestimates gluten contamination from barley; the other (sandwich R5 ELISA) overestimates gluten contamination from barley by a factor of 2. And when it comes to testing for gluten in a hydrolyzed product (a product that has been partially broken down), such as barley malt extract, the test that usually overestimates barley contamination may now underestimate it. It really is a confusing situation! Fortunately, there is an assay available for testing hydrolyzed ingredients. It is called the competitive R5 ELISA.

How much gluten does barley malt extract contain?
When 3 barley malt extracts were tested for gluten using the competitive R5 ELISA, they contained approximately 320, 960, and 1300 parts per million (ppm) gluten. Taking into account the fact that the R5 ELISA may overestimate barley contamination by a factor of 2, the extracts more likely contained approximately 160, 480, and 650 ppm gluten.

Obviously, when barley malt extract is an ingredient in a food product, such as breakfast cereals, waffles, and pancakes, the ppm gluten content of the final food product will be far less than the ppm gluten content of the extract. In one study that assessed the gluten content from barley in two breakfast cereals containing barley malt extract, one product contained 795 ppm gluten; the other 171 ppm gluten. “

And then I see advice from medical sources, like this:

 “In the FDA’s proposed rule for labeling of food as gluten free, malt ingredients are included among those ingredients that can not be included in labeled gluten-free foods. It doesn’t matter if the final food product contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten.”

So I suppose I can see why this Promax’s party line on the issue, however all research I’ve done says that barley malt/barley malt extract still has gluten, although it may not be in high amounts. Even the FDA is having a problem with this!

And I’ve found that the smallest amount of things – like oat bran, for instance – can make me sick. For people with Celiacs, the only way to live is by eliminating all possible sources of gluten, even those which are declared “safe” despite their name; we know that sometimes what our bodies tell us is ahead of the current information. I’ve also read that less than 1/8 tsp of an ingredient can kick off your symptoms, and I have no idea how that corresponds with the 20ppm standard. And since other companies have chosen to remove barley malt extract because of the Celiac issue, it seems like there is in fact a problem for some consumers.

So again, I shall be returning them.

I don’t blame the Promax company, and I don’t think they’re trying to “fool” people into eating traces of wheat. However I do think it’s difficult that there are all these extracts and flavorings out there that are mysterious in origin or content, and it’s nearly impossible to cut them out of your diet. So I guess that means you have to be proactive when you can!

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Why We Still Need to Read Labels, An Update! | CookingPlanet
  2. neverpresumetoknow
    Jan 18, 2012 @ 08:37:40

    I guess with all the different types of foods that we cannot eat because of intolerances, there is always that temptation each time we open the pantry cupboard or fridge. Do you struggle with cravings for things you can’t eat?
    I find it a real challenge to stay away from honey and chocolate and watermelon.

    Reply

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